Chinese Silver Panda

Chinese Silver Panda

The Chinese Silver Panda coins are produced by several mints through out China, including Shenzhen, Shanghai and Shenyang.  The coins have been produced since 1983, with the exception of 1986. They are produced in various sizes and denominations from 0.5 troy ounce to 1 kilogram.

The obverse of the coin is a depiction of a famous Beijing structure, the Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest of the Temple of Heaven.  Included on each coin is the Gregorian calendar minting year. In addition, there is a series of  Chinese characters, which translates to “People’s Republic of China”.

The reverse side provides the coin’s namesake, with portraits of panda bears.  These portraits change each year (with the exception of 2002, which continued the previous year’s design).  This consistent change in design is done in an effort to attract collectors and investors alike who are fans of the panda. In the particular design shown at left, two baby pandas are sitting and eating in a field of bamboo.

The minting of each annual coin is relatively low in direct comparison to the silver bullion coin production of other countries.  As a result of this relative scarcity, combined with the collectible popularity stemming from the variation in designs each year, the market prices of these coins are often higher than comparable silver bullion coins from other nations.