Mexican Silver Libertad

Mexican Silver Libertad
Mexican Silver Libertad

The Mexican Silver Libertad (Liberty) in its basic form, contains one-ounce of pure 99.9% silver.  The coin is minted by La Casa de Moneda de Mexico (The Mexican Mint), the oldest mint in the Americas with its establishment dating back to 1536.  First produced in 1949, the coin was discontinued for years.  Production resumed in 1978 and has been continuous since then.

Regardless of the minting year, the obverse of the coin consistently features the symbol of a winged female, in reference to Victoria, the Roman goddess of victory.  In 1996, the design was updated to reflect the Angel of Independence, perched atop a victory column in Mexico City.  One of Mexico’s most recognizable landmarks, the column was erected in 1910 to celebrate Mexico’s War of Independence. Behind El Angel de la Independencia (the Angel of Independence), two legendary volcanic mountains are visible. The coin design is altered slightly each year to attract collectors and to compete with other troy ounce silver coins.

The Libertad’s design makes reference to both pre-Hispanic legend as well as the country’s independence from Spain in 1821. On the reverse, the center of the coin shows an eagle and a snake at battle, the coat of arms of Mexico and national seal of Mexico.  There are 10 additional, smaller seals that surround  the  coat of arms, all previous emblems used during Mexico’s history.  Sandwiched between the old and new seals, the inscription “Estados Unidos Mexicanos” (United Mexican States) appears.

Like most silver coins today, the Mexican Silver Libertad is minted primarily for investment purposes, deriving its value from the amount of silver it contains.